News

Physorg.com and other scientific websites have posted articles on Joseph Goldstein of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department and his research team, which is trying to produce an iron-nickel alloy that is currently only found in meteorites for use in making supermagnets. The goal of the research is to develop bulk quantities of commercially viable, environmentally sound supermagnets, which can be used in electric vehicles, wind-turbine generators, and many other machines. The first phase of the work is funded by an 18-month, $3.3-million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy program. The UMass Amherst share of the grant is approximately $300,000.

Last semester the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (MIE) Department added a powerful new leadership component to its curriculum, the Engineering Leadership, Innovation, Teaching, and Entrepreneurship Program. Simply call it ELITE for short! The ELITE Program equips some of the department’s most promising students with the leadership, entrepreneurial, and communications skills to expand the pool of engineers who become CEOs, founding officers, supervisors, directors, managers, and teachers. “We look at the ELITE Program as the first step along swelling the pipeline of leaders,” says MIE Department Head Don Fisher, who started the program at the beginning of 2012 with the help of some very generous donors, led by alumnus Bob Hagerty.

On Thursday, December 6, alumnus Christopher Larkin (’88 M.S.) will speak about “Keeping Patients Safe and Healthy with Advanced Technology” during a special alumni seminar held in the Gunness Student and Conference Center in Marcus Hall on the University of Massachusetts Amherst campus. Mr. Larkin is the chief technology officer at GE Healthcare, a company with more than 10,000 employees. The seminar will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and is free and open to everyone.

Industrial engineering major Moa Mattsson, a forward on the UMass Amherst women's soccer team, earned CoSIDA Academic All-Region First Team laurels, as announced by the organization recently. Mattsson led the Minutewomen with 29 points on 12 goals and five assists while earning a 3.96 GPA in the classroom. Mattsson has also been recognized by the A-10 Conference for her success on the field and in the classroom this season, earning All-Atlantic 10 First Team and Academic All-Conference awards.

The UMass IGERT Offshore Wind Energy Program, started with a $3.2-million grant from the National Science Foundation in August of 2011, is now spinning at full speed as it generates an interdisciplinary graduate program in offshore wind energy engineering, environmental science, and policy. Some 25 faculty members from nine UMass Amherst departments are currently educating 13 full-time graduate students from five different departments. The goal of the program is to create a community of researchers who understand the technological challenges, environmental implications, and socioeconomic and regulatory hurdles of offshore wind farms. The program will eventually train 24 doctoral students over the course of five years.

Join the College of Engineering faculty, staff and alumni for an in-door pre-game tailgate party at the Putnam Club at Gillette Stadium!

Saturday, November 17, 2012
Putnam Club North East Lounge
1:30 p.m.

Enjoy a festive afternoon of tailgating and reconnecting with old friends before UMass hits the field to play the University of Buffalo Bulls at 3:00 p.m.

This event is free however registration and football game tickets are required to enter the Putnam Club

The link to register and purchase tickets is below.

https://secure.www.alumniconnections.com/olc/pub/UMS/event/showEventForm.jsp?form_id=136939

Use special code ENGINEER when purchasing football tickets.

 

Rachel Koh, who recently completed her B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Vermont, is the first recipient of the Kenneth A. Lloyd Fellowship, awarded to this highly-qualified incoming doctoral student in the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (MIE) Department. Mr. Lloyd graduated from the College of Engineering in 1973, having majored in mechanical engineering, and is currently the vice president and general manager of Electro Switch Corporation in Weymouth, Massachusetts.

Sundar Krishnamurty, the director of the Center for e-Design and a professor in the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, leads a multidisciplinary team that received a 2012 National Science Foundation (NSF) Innovation Corps, or I-Corps, award. The I-Corps program aims to prepare scientists and engineers to extend their focus beyond the laboratory and broadens the impact of select NSF-funded projects. It is one of 100 awards for this year and the first such grant awarded to UMass Amherst. The project funded by the NSF builds upon a fundamental new way of thinking about innovation, tentatively called an “Innovation Accelerator” (AI), and replaces the minimally successful artificial intelligence techniques from the 1980s that were unable to get machines to be innovative by themselves.

It’s not every undergraduate who has the chance to do research that will have a life-altering impact on thousands of people at risk from the side-effects of diabetes. But industrial engineering major Jennifer Badylak-Reals of Plymouth, New Hampshire did. She carried out key research for faculty member Jenna Marquard of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department on a $2-million NIH project to develop special, low-cost, health-information technology, which allows diabetics to test their blood pressure in the comfort of home and then send those readings automatically to nurses so their medication can be adjusted as frequently as needed.

Professor Joseph Goldstein of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is part of a research team on a fast-track Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop bulk quantities of commercially viable, environmentally sound supermagnets, which can be used in electric vehicles, wind-turbine generators, and many other machines. The researchers are attempting to synthesize and produce the kind of magnetic, iron-nickel, crystal structure that until now has been found only in meteorites, taking billions of years to develop in space.