The University of Massachusetts Amherst
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Search Google Appliance

Links

Research Area: Materials Science

The materials group at UMass Amherst is composed of two labs, the Computational Nanomaterials Laboratory and the Materials and Processes Laboratory. The Computational Nanomaterials Laboratory is a young research group lead by Ashwin Ramasubramaniam, with overarching interests that lie in using computational methods to probe materials at length scales ranging from the nano- to macroscale. This lab's primary tools are density functional theory, empirical potential methods, and continuum mechanics-based models (with the occasional paper-and-pencil theory too). The Materials and Processes Laboratory, headed by Dr. Robert Hyers, conducts research in the design and control of the processes that lead to the required structure or properties in materials. This lab uses mathematical modeling to identify and quantify the effect of different process parameters on the structure and properties of materials, and measure the thermophysical properties that are used in the models.

Research Laboratories

Computational Nanomaterials Laboratory

Welcome to the Computational Nanomaterials Laboratory at UMass Amherst. We are a young research group lead by Ashwin Ramasubramaniam, Professor in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and Adjunct Faculty in Chemical Engineering. Our group members come from diverse backgrounds, but our overarching interests lie in using computational methods to probe materials at length scales ranging from the nano- to macroscale. Our primary tools are density functional theory, empirical potential methods, and continuum mechanics-based models (with the occasional paper-and-pencil theory too). Some of our recent and past activities are...Read More

Lee Nano Engineering Laboratory

Nano-Engineering Lab focuses on materials science and manufacturing of various materials related to extreme mechanical conditions. Our research scope includes high-strain-rate mechanical characterization of various feedstock powders in cold spray additive manufacturing, design/manufacturing of nanostructure-engineered protective materials and mechanical metamaterials. Using  an ultrafast laser-based imaging technique and the laser-induced particle impact (LIPIT) method, we perform the high spatial (sub-micrometer) and high temporal (sub-nanosecond) measurement of material’s deformation. Our lab aims to innovate in future manufacturing materials and technologies.

Associated Faculty: Jae-Hwang Lee

Materials and Processes Lab

Materials processing, the basis of materials engineering, is the relationship among structure, properties, and processing: any one determines the other two. Our research is on the design and control of the processes that lead to the required structure or properties in materials. We use mathematical modeling to identify and quantify the effect of different process parameters on the structure and properties of materials, and measure the thermophysical properties that are used in the models...Read More

Multiscale Materials and Manufacturing Laboratory

Multiscale Materials and Manufacturing Laboratory works at the interface of materials science and advanced manufacturing. We are particularly interested in understanding the fundamental microstructure-property-processing relationships in advanced materials and integrating control over materials on different length scales (atomic structure, microstructure, architecture) through materials processing and additive manufacturing (or 3D printing), to eventually arrive at optimized, multi-functional engineering components. 

Nano/Bio Interface Lab

Research

Nanomaterials

Nanomaterials are materials with at least one of their three dimensions limited to nanometer, that is, a scale that quantum effects emerge. Two-dimensional (2D) materials is a class of nanomaterials with outstanding electrical, mechanical, chemical, and bio-transducing properties. Using methods based on chemical vapor deposition, 2D materials can be prepared in large scale (~ m) and high quality with tunable strength, transparency, disorder density, and electron transport properties.

Development of High-Performance 2D-Bio Interface Technologies

Interfacing biosystems with 2D materials by developing 2D-enabled biosensing devices and systems provides significant opportunities for interrogating the life activities and biological/physiological properties (pH, electrostatic potential, structure & function, concentration, etc.) of biosystems with unprecedented sensitivity, spatiotemporal resolution, and efficiency in power, size, cost, and time. 

Translation of 2D-Based Biosensors

Device structures based on 2D materials can be translated into precise, point-of-use, portable (PPP) biosensing tools for healthcare, screening/diagnosis of diseases such as HIV and cancer, or even environmental monitoring. Another application of 2D-based devices/systems is implantable arrays of graphene microelectrodes for chronic monitoring of life activities/effects.

Nanoscale Interfaces Transport & Energy (NITE) Lab

The Nanoscale Interfaces, Transport, and Energy (NITE) Laboratory evaluates materials for energy transduction applications via direct, in-situ observation of local responses along critical heterophase interfaces in the operating regime.